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Biographical entry Squibb, George James (1798 - 1859)

MRCS Feb 21st 1821; FRCS Aug 12th 1852; M and LSA 1820.

Born
1798
Died
15 January 1859
London
Occupation
General surgeon

Details

Practised at 40 York Place, Baker Street; in Orchard Street, Portman Square; and at 11 Montague Place, Bryanston Square. He was an active member of the British Medical Association and of the Metropolitan Counties Branch, of which in 1857 he was elected President. When he died the Council of the Branch, in a letter of condolence to his widow, expressed regret at his death, mentioning the courteous and impartial manner in which he discharged the duties of his office, his generous hospitality at the various meetings held at his house, and his endeavour to carry out one great object of the Association - the promotion of social intercourse and kindly feeling amongst members.

At one of his accustomed conversaziones, Sir Nathaniel Holland's portrait of John Hunter, which Squibb had recently purchased, was placed on an easel in the middle of the drawing-room, and Sir John Doratt (qv), C J Guthrie, and Marshall Hall, amongst others, discussed the portrait. Doratt, the last surviving pupil of Hunter, being asked if it was a good likeness, said: "Yes, a very good one; better, in fact, than the celebrated portrait by Reynolds, only it gives you the idea of a large man, which Hunter was not." Marshall Hall interjected: "A little man, was he? How curious! Napoleon Bonaparte and some other persons whose names I have forgotten, and myself - all little men." Guthrie, also standing by, looked down on him with great contempt and, turning on his heel, said, "Yes, you are a little man."

Squibb had collected a series of 1340 medical portraits. It was purchased by the Royal Medico-Chirurgical Society in 1864 for the sum of £70 and is now preserved at the Royal Society of Medicine as 'The Squibb Collection'.

Squibb died at 11 Montague Place, Bryanston Square, on Jan 15th, 1859.

The Royal College of Surgeons of England