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Biographical entry Oldershaw, Martin Herbert (1891 - 1937)

MRCS 26 July 1917; FRCS 11 December 1919; MB BS London 1917; MD 1919; LRCP 1917.

Born
27 June 1891
London
Died
2 August 1937
London
Occupation
Obstetrician and gynaecologist

Details

Born 27 July 1891 at Clifton Hill, Maida Vale, London, the third child of Herbert Augustus Oldershaw, solicitor, and his wife née Godrich. He was educated at the Brighton Technical College and at University College Hospital. At the Hospital he gained the Bucknill scholarship in 1913, and served as casualty surgical officer, holiday surgeon, and obstetrical registrar. His interests centred chiefly in obstetrics and gynaecology and he was elected surgeon to the Soho Square Hospital for Women in 1914, an appointment he held until his death. He was afterwards consulting obstetrician to the Lewisham Hospital and to the London County Council, and consulting gynaecologist to the St Pancras Borough Council, to the British Red Cross Clinic for Rheumatism in Regent's Park and to the St John's Clinic for Rheumatism in Pimlico, and was honorary secretary for four years to the Hunterian Society. He also acted as an examiner for the Central Midwives Board.

He married on 31 March 1921 Olive Lattey, whose father invented the telescopic sight for rifles; she survived him with a son. He died on 2 August 1937 at 26 Upper Wimpole Street. Oldershaw had always been delicate and from the age of fifteen had suffered from albuminuria. Two large stones were removed from his bladder in 1926 and shortly before his death he had albuminuric retinitis. In spite of these drawbacks he did a good life's work, made many friends, served as master of the Cavendish Lodge of freemasons, and was a successful deep-sea fisherman.

Publication:
Significance of bleeding as a symptom in gynaecology. Clin J 1925, 54, 436.

Sources used to compile this entry: [The Times, 3 August 1937, p 12e, and an appreciation in the issue of 4 August 1937, p 14b; Lancet, 1937, 2, 356; Brit med J 1937, 2, 396; information given by Mrs Oldershaw].

The Royal College of Surgeons of England