Browse Fellows

Google

www Lives

Biographical entry Skevington, Sir Joseph Oliver (1873 - 1952)

KCVO 1919; MRCS 10 February 1898; FRCS 14 December 1899; LRCP 1898.

Born
2 February 1873
Rothley, Leicestershire
Died
29 February 1952
Windsor
Occupation
General surgeon

Details

Born at Rothley, Leicestershire on 2 February 1873 the second son of J H Skevington JP, a farmer, and his wife Emma Kirkham, he was educated at Oakham, Rutlandshire and at St Mary's Hospital, London, where he served as house surgeon. After a period as clinical assistant at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for sick children he went to the South African war as a civil surgeon with the field force.

Skevington then settled at Windsor as a consultant, and attained to a large practice in the neighbourhood. He became surgeon and later senior consulting surgeon to the King Edward VII Hospital, Windsor, which he also served as radiologist, and he was consulting surgeon to the cottage hospitals at Bagshot, Egham, Iver, Maidenhead, Staines, and Windlesham, and to Ascot hospital, the Raymead children's hospital at Maidenhead, and HRH Princess Alice's home for totally disabled soldiers and sailors at Slough.

During the war of 1914-18 he served under the British Red Cross as senior civil surgeon at their No 2 hospital at Rouen, and later with the rank of Captain RAMC (1918) was attached to the Brigade of Guards at Pirbright camp and in command of the Victoria Barracks, Windsor. He was knighted KCVO in 1919. In the war of 1939-45 he was commissioned Surgeon-Major in the Home Guard.

Skevington retired in 1937 after thirty-four years active work, but continued to live at Belmont, 15 York-road, Windsor. The operating theatre at the King Edward VII hospital was named Skevington in his honour. He was a well-known and popular figure in the district, liked for his downright opinions and practical ability. He never married. He died at his own house on 29 February 1952 aged 79.

Publications:

Valvular pneumothorax, with W Ferris. St Mary's Hosp Gaz 1898, 4, 90.
Two cases of aneurysm. Ibid 1901, 7, 3.

Sources used to compile this entry: [The Times 3 March 1952 p 6 e; Brit med J 1952, 1, 660 by J G Jones; information from Miss Agnes Brooks of Windsor].

The Royal College of Surgeons of England