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Biographical entry Kindersley, Charles Edward (1890 - 1966)

MRCS 1916; FRCS 1930; MB BCh Cambridge 1920; LRCP 1916.

Born
5 May 1890
Eton
Died
20 November 1966
Occupation
General practitioner and Orthopaedic surgeon

Details

Charles Kindersley was born on 5 May 1890 at Eton, where his father was a housemaster. He was educated at Sedbergh, where he won his colours for rugby, cricket and shooting, and at Magdalen College, Cambridge, where he graduated BA in 1912. He then went to St Bartholomew's Hospital where he qualified with the Conjoint Diploma in 1916, and he played rugger for Bart's, the United Hospitals and the Harlequins. He served for the remainder of the first world war in the Royal Navy, and in 1918 he married Miss Peggy Carlisle, by whom he had two sons.

On demobilization he served as a house surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath, and took his MB in 1920. He then went into general practice at Warminster where he was instrumental in building up the Cottage Hospital, and the surgery he was able to do there convinced him that he should make it his career. Therefore in 1928 he courageously gave up the practice and returned to Bart's as a demonstrator of anatomy, in preparation for the Fellowship which he obtained in 1930.

In the same year he was appointed consultant surgeon to the Royal United Hospital, and for the next 25 years he worked tirelessly and methodically to improve the hospital services in the Bath clinical area. He started a fracture clinic in the hospital which developed into a complete orthopaedic department; he joined the staff of the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases where he inaugurated a plaster service for arthritics; and he played a prominent part in the integration of the group of cottage hospitals in the neighbourhood of Bath. In 1939 he joined the local Territorial hospital and took charge of the surgical division, but had to resign on health grounds in 1941, though he was well enough to continue his hospital duties till his retirement in 1955 when the regional board appointed him Emeritus Consulting Surgeon.

Kindersley's energies were not confined to his clinical duties, for he showed a special aptitude for committee work. After serving for many years on the Hospital Management Committee he was its Chairman from 1957 till 1965. In the British Medical Association he was Chairman of the Bath Division in 1944, and President of the Bath, Bristol and Somerset Branch in 1953-54; he also served on the Central Consultants and Specialists Committee. No doubt his success as a committee man was akin to his faculty for creating a team spirit among his surgical colleagues, and sharing out the work and its rewards. He took a special interest in the educational programmes of the Royal College of Surgeons, and his assistance at the time of the re-building appeal was greatly appreciated.

Charles was a good shot, but his chief recreation was salmon fishing on his beloved river Dart. His enthusiasm for life and work never seemed to wane, even in retirement, and it was after only a short illness that he died on 20 November 1966. His second wife Evelyn and one of his sons survived him.

Sources used to compile this entry: [Lancet 1966, 2, 1258; Brit med J 1966, 2, 1396].

The Royal College of Surgeons of England