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Biographical entry Jones, Arthur Edward (1919 - 1999)

MRCS 1942; FRCS 1978; MB BS London 1943; MD 1945; DMRT 1948; LRCP 1942; MRCP 1945; FRCP 1965; FRCR 1975; FFR 1967; Hon FACR 1981.

Born
1 February 1919
Wrexham, North Wales
Died
4 July 1999
Occupation
Radiotherapist

Details

Arthur Jones was a pioneering radiotherapist. He was born in Wrexham, North Wales, on 1 February 1919. His father, Edward Hugh Jones, died when he was young and he was brought up by his mother, Margaret Lloyd Jones. He was educated at Grove Park School, where he became interested in physics, and his decision (at the age of 17) to become a radiotherapist was encouraged by his mother. He won the Jeaffreson entrance exhibition to Bart's in French and mathematics, and there proceeded to gain a dazzling number of awards. He gained scholarships in anatomy and physiology, the Harvey prize in physiology, the Wix prize, the Brackenbury scholarship, the Dame Dorothy Jeffreys exhibition, the Dodd memorial award and the Wall bursary. Girling Ball was the Dean, but his real hero was Frank Lloyd Hopwood, the Professor of Physics. He was dresser to Paterson Ross, who was the clinician who influenced him most. On qualifying, he was house physician to Christie and house surgeon to Douglas Northfield at the London, who kindled his interest in the nervous system.

On joining the RAMC, he served at the Military Hospital for Head Injuries at St Hughes, Oxford, along with Walpole Lewin, under Sir Hugh Cairns and Sir Charles Symonds, ending as a Major in charge of a neurological centre in Hamburg, where he became an expert in the management of head injuries.

On returning to Bart's after the war, he served as chief assistant to I G Williams, and, in 1950, he was appointed consultant (at the age of 30), as deputy director in the radiotherapeutic department. He became physician to the department in 1961 and director in 1972. In 1974, the title of Professor of Radiotherapy was conferred on him by the University of London, the first such title to be awarded to an NHS consultant.

He was Vice-President of the Royal College of Radiologists from 1967 to 1968, and was co-opted to the Council of the Royal College of Surgeons to represent radiology in 1973. He was Hunterian Professor in 1960, and was made an FRCS by election in 1978. He was much sought after to lecture abroad and served on innumerable committees. He was Dean of the Medical College at Bart's from 1968 to 1969.

He was particularly interested in music and the history of art. He married Caroline Bonsor in 1945. They had one daughter, Deirdre Anne, and one son, Daril Peregrine Lloyd, a dental surgeon. He died on 4 July 1999.

Sources used to compile this entry: [Med Pediatr Oncol 2000 34 85-86].

The Royal College of Surgeons of England